Feed the need

fastcompany:

Ka-Pow: Watch These Fish Cannons Shoot Salmon Safely Over Dams
Salmon have serious swimming skills—some travel thousands of miles to return to their original homes to breed. But even though they can jump as high as 12 feet in the air, they can’t manage to get over massive concrete dams that we have built to block their journeys back to their homes. Now one new idea could give them a boost. The plan involves whisking the fish through a long vacuum tube at speeds up to 22 miles per hour and then shooting them out the other end like a cannon.
Read More>

Coolfastcompany:

Ka-Pow: Watch These Fish Cannons Shoot Salmon Safely Over Dams
Salmon have serious swimming skills—some travel thousands of miles to return to their original homes to breed. But even though they can jump as high as 12 feet in the air, they can’t manage to get over massive concrete dams that we have built to block their journeys back to their homes. Now one new idea could give them a boost. The plan involves whisking the fish through a long vacuum tube at speeds up to 22 miles per hour and then shooting them out the other end like a cannon.
Read More>

Cool

fastcompany:

Ka-Pow: Watch These Fish Cannons Shoot Salmon Safely Over Dams

Salmon have serious swimming skills—some travel thousands of miles to return to their original homes to breed. But even though they can jump as high as 12 feet in the air, they can’t manage to get over massive concrete dams that we have built to block their journeys back to their homes. Now one new idea could give them a boost. The plan involves whisking the fish through a long vacuum tube at speeds up to 22 miles per hour and then shooting them out the other end like a cannon.

Read More>

Cool


(Phys.org) —A team of researchers at Delft University in the Netherlands is reporting in a paper they have had published in the journal Science, that they have successfully used entanglement as a means of communication, over a distance of ten feet (three meters). Furthermore, they note, they did so with 100 percent reliability and without altering the spin state of the quantum bits (qubits) involved.

http://m.phys.org/news/2014-05-team-accurately-teleported-quantum-ten.html

(Phys.org) —A team of researchers at Delft University in the Netherlands is reporting in a paper they have had published in the journal Science, that they have successfully used entanglement as a means of communication, over a distance of ten feet (three meters). Furthermore, they note, they did so with 100 percent reliability and without altering the spin state of the quantum bits (qubits) involved.

http://m.phys.org/news/2014-05-team-accurately-teleported-quantum-ten.html


thatscienceguy:

About two weeks ago Rocket Lab, an NZ firm based in Auckland, announced a new satellite launching rocket. 
The super-light weight design is comprised of advanced carbon fibre technology, combined with the efficiency of the patent pending Rutherford engines, (named after NZ born physicist Ernst Rutherford) the rocket will be able to deliver a 110kg (242 pounds) payload to a 500km (310 miles) orbit for an amazing $4.9 million! 
This probably doesnt sound like much, but with todays electronics 110kg is enough for any satellite, and the amazing thing is - $4.9m is barely anything compared to the $56-$100 million of other launch systems. $4.9 million is approximately 1000 times cheaper than each of the apollo missions.
Not to mention the incredibly low amount of fuel use - less than it takes to fly a 737 from San Fran to LA!
The figures speak for themselves, and as such rocketlab have already booked over 37 launches, with the first scheduled for next year. The ultimate goal is to be launching 100 a year.
And on a personal note - as i actually live in Auckland - I am So excited to see this happen! 100 launches a year = 2 a week, from what will hopefully be a launchpad within driving distance of home!

Rockets rock

thatscienceguy:

About two weeks ago Rocket Lab, an NZ firm based in Auckland, announced a new satellite launching rocket. 

The super-light weight design is comprised of advanced carbon fibre technology, combined with the efficiency of the patent pending Rutherford engines, (named after NZ born physicist Ernst Rutherford) the rocket will be able to deliver a 110kg (242 pounds) payload to a 500km (310 miles) orbit for an amazing $4.9 million! 

This probably doesnt sound like much, but with todays electronics 110kg is enough for any satellite, and the amazing thing is - $4.9m is barely anything compared to the $56-$100 million of other launch systems. $4.9 million is approximately 1000 times cheaper than each of the apollo missions.

Not to mention the incredibly low amount of fuel use - less than it takes to fly a 737 from San Fran to LA!

The figures speak for themselves, and as such rocketlab have already booked over 37 launches, with the first scheduled for next year. The ultimate goal is to be launching 100 a year.

And on a personal note - as i actually live in Auckland - I am So excited to see this happen! 100 launches a year = 2 a week, from what will hopefully be a launchpad within driving distance of home!

Rockets rock