Feed the need

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo
The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.
Who knew?
(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)


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jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo

The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.

Who knew?

(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

Neat


emergentfutures:

Google tests waters for potential ultra-fast wireless service


Google Inc is preparing to test new technology that may provide the foundation for a wireless version of its high-speed “Fiber” Internet service, according to telecommunication experts who scrutinized the company’s regulatory filings.

In a public but little-noticed application with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission on Monday, Google asked the agency for permission to conduct tests in California across different wireless spectrums, including a rarely-used millimeter-wave frequency capable of transmitting large amounts of data.


Full Story: Reuters

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emergentfutures:

Google tests waters for potential ultra-fast wireless service

Google Inc is preparing to test new technology that may provide the foundation for a wireless version of its high-speed “Fiber” Internet service, according to telecommunication experts who scrutinized the company’s regulatory filings.

In a public but little-noticed application with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission on Monday, Google asked the agency for permission to conduct tests in California across different wireless spectrums, including a rarely-used millimeter-wave frequency capable of transmitting large amounts of data.

Full Story: Reuters

Cool


mindblowingscience:

Could We Already Have an Alternative to LEDs?

The Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded just last week to the three experts who brought revolutionary blue LEDs into our lives. However, a new team of physicists from Japan are saying that they have already crafted a more efficient and nature-friendly alternative light source.

That’s at least according to a study recently published in the journal Review of Scientific Instruments, an American Institute of Physics (API) publication.
While LEDs are a boon to the alternative power industry, capable of lighting entire households at a fraction of the energy costs of traditional lighting, Nature World News recently reported how these lights are also a threat to the natural world.
Experts are arguing that the shot spectrum blue light that comes from these LEDs has major disruptive influences on nocturnal life, drawing pests to urban areas and even ports where they can be whisked away to other parts of the world to unwittingly become an invasive species.
Health experts have also previously argued that LEDs are even bad for humans once dusk falls, as their light disrupts circadian rhythms and leads to sleepless and stressful nights.
That’s why experts at Tokyo University have been looking into alternative forms of energy efficient lighting, and they think they’ve got one.
"Our simple ‘diode’ panel could obtain high brightness efficiency of 60 Lumen per Watt, which holds excellent potential for a lighting device with low power consumption," Norihiro Shimoi, the lead researcher, said in a recent release.
The new light uses carbon nanotubes - a technology that seems to be practically everywhere these days - coupled with a complex chemical liquid mixture. The concept uses a simple phosphor screen as the main source of light, and looks like a simple flat panel that glows on its own.
And it’s a powerful glow. Compared to LEDs, the new panels consume 100 times less energy and are only about 40 Lumens per Watt less bright.
And the good news? Although the device has a diode-like structure, its light-emitting system is not based on a true diode system. It does not use altered blue wavelength emitting diodes to create a soft white light.
"Many researchers have attempted to construct light sources with carbon nanotubes as field emitter," Shimoi added proudly. "But nobody has developed an equivalent and simpler lighting device."


OLEDmindblowingscience:

Could We Already Have an Alternative to LEDs?

The Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded just last week to the three experts who brought revolutionary blue LEDs into our lives. However, a new team of physicists from Japan are saying that they have already crafted a more efficient and nature-friendly alternative light source.

That’s at least according to a study recently published in the journal Review of Scientific Instruments, an American Institute of Physics (API) publication.
While LEDs are a boon to the alternative power industry, capable of lighting entire households at a fraction of the energy costs of traditional lighting, Nature World News recently reported how these lights are also a threat to the natural world.
Experts are arguing that the shot spectrum blue light that comes from these LEDs has major disruptive influences on nocturnal life, drawing pests to urban areas and even ports where they can be whisked away to other parts of the world to unwittingly become an invasive species.
Health experts have also previously argued that LEDs are even bad for humans once dusk falls, as their light disrupts circadian rhythms and leads to sleepless and stressful nights.
That’s why experts at Tokyo University have been looking into alternative forms of energy efficient lighting, and they think they’ve got one.
"Our simple ‘diode’ panel could obtain high brightness efficiency of 60 Lumen per Watt, which holds excellent potential for a lighting device with low power consumption," Norihiro Shimoi, the lead researcher, said in a recent release.
The new light uses carbon nanotubes - a technology that seems to be practically everywhere these days - coupled with a complex chemical liquid mixture. The concept uses a simple phosphor screen as the main source of light, and looks like a simple flat panel that glows on its own.
And it’s a powerful glow. Compared to LEDs, the new panels consume 100 times less energy and are only about 40 Lumens per Watt less bright.
And the good news? Although the device has a diode-like structure, its light-emitting system is not based on a true diode system. It does not use altered blue wavelength emitting diodes to create a soft white light.
"Many researchers have attempted to construct light sources with carbon nanotubes as field emitter," Shimoi added proudly. "But nobody has developed an equivalent and simpler lighting device."


OLED

mindblowingscience:

Could We Already Have an Alternative to LEDs?

The Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded just last week to the three experts who brought revolutionary blue LEDs into our lives. However, a new team of physicists from Japan are saying that they have already crafted a more efficient and nature-friendly alternative light source.

That’s at least according to a study recently published in the journal Review of Scientific Instruments, an American Institute of Physics (API) publication.

While LEDs are a boon to the alternative power industry, capable of lighting entire households at a fraction of the energy costs of traditional lighting, Nature World News recently reported how these lights are also a threat to the natural world.

Experts are arguing that the shot spectrum blue light that comes from these LEDs has major disruptive influences on nocturnal life, drawing pests to urban areas and even ports where they can be whisked away to other parts of the world to unwittingly become an invasive species.

Health experts have also previously argued that LEDs are even bad for humans once dusk falls, as their light disrupts circadian rhythms and leads to sleepless and stressful nights.

That’s why experts at Tokyo University have been looking into alternative forms of energy efficient lighting, and they think they’ve got one.

"Our simple ‘diode’ panel could obtain high brightness efficiency of 60 Lumen per Watt, which holds excellent potential for a lighting device with low power consumption," Norihiro Shimoi, the lead researcher, said in a recent release.

The new light uses carbon nanotubes - a technology that seems to be practically everywhere these days - coupled with a complex chemical liquid mixture. The concept uses a simple phosphor screen as the main source of light, and looks like a simple flat panel that glows on its own.

And it’s a powerful glow. Compared to LEDs, the new panels consume 100 times less energy and are only about 40 Lumens per Watt less bright.

And the good news? Although the device has a diode-like structure, its light-emitting system is not based on a true diode system. It does not use altered blue wavelength emitting diodes to create a soft white light.

"Many researchers have attempted to construct light sources with carbon nanotubes as field emitter," Shimoi added proudly. "But nobody has developed an equivalent and simpler lighting device."

OLED


nanotechnologyworld:

A simple and versatile way to build three-dimensional materials of the future
Researchers in Japan have developed a novel yet simple technique, called “diffusion driven layer-by-layer assembly,” to construct graphene into porous three-dimensional (3D) structures for applications in devices such as batteries and supercapacitors.
http://www.icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp/e/pr/2014/10/16-nr.html

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nanotechnologyworld:

A simple and versatile way to build three-dimensional materials of the future

Researchers in Japan have developed a novel yet simple technique, called “diffusion driven layer-by-layer assembly,” to construct graphene into porous three-dimensional (3D) structures for applications in devices such as batteries and supercapacitors.

http://www.icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp/e/pr/2014/10/16-nr.html

Good stuff


prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here

Wicketprostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here

Wicketprostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here

Wicketprostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here

Wicketprostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here

Wicketprostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here

Wicketprostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here

Wicket

prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials

Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.

Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here

Wicket